A Return to the Past, A Path to the Future

A landscape photograph. The background is made of a gray sky peaking through the branches of leafless trees which are covered in cascades of blooming wisteria, appearing as a purple haze around the branches. The foreground is vibrant green, mostly wisteria and ivy, a few blooms of wisteria clearly visible. To the right in the foreground is the corner of an abandoned house, paint peeled away and mostly gray, darker than the sky, with remnants of vibrant teal pain along the bottom edges. Photograph by author.

So, I tried a new thing. In Gaelic Polytheism, we don’t usually celebrate what many Pagans call the “Quarter Days,” (Yule, Ostara, Litha, Mabon) usually just celebrating our Fire Festivals that most of the generally Pagan Cross-quarter Days come from (Samhain, Imbolc, Bealtaine, Lughnasadh). A few years ago, maybe longer, I started celebrating Grianstad an tSamhraidh (Midsummer). We know historically that rent was payed to Manannán Mac Lir for his protection of Ellan Vannin (Isle of Mann) and in southern Ireland Áine was honored at the same time. A year or so after that, I also decided it made sense to celebrate Grianne at the opposite point of the year, Grianstad an Gheimhridh (Midwinter).

But for the last couple years, it’s really struck me how much that doesn’t line up with my seasons Down South. I’d already made mental adjustments, thinkin of the holidays truly as the beginning of seasons rather than just days, but it still wasn’t right. And it makes sense. This far south of Ireland, our climate varies muuuuch more wildly. Our winters are shorter (though can be colder or warmer), come later, leave sooner. We rarely get snow. And our summers come soon are are easily 30°F/21°C hotter. We have much faster and more visible transitions. So, oddly enough, I’ve moved forward while lookin back, so to speak. This year, I decided to use the Spring Equinox (I don’t know the Irish for this or how appropriate it would be) to officially say goodbye to Grianne for the year and welcome Áine. It was nothin major, but it felt nice to do it. I’ve got a pair of candles on either end of my house, one for each that represent winter and summer that I burned from sundown to sundown and gave water to Grianne for her rest while offering flowers to Áine as a welcome and thanks for the warmth to come. The plan, I think, is to do the inverse come Autumn Equinox and incorporate this into my relgious calendar.

An image of Áine’s shrine. A y’all candle in summer shades of yellows, oranges, and a few reds is surrounded by pink and white azalea blooms, a purple iris, unknown small white flowers in clusters on branches, and cascades of wisteria, all on a teal table. There is a window behind that is dark, reflecting the light from inside the house. Photograph by author.

It’s strange because, after years of somewhat retraining my brain to forget the 8 holidays of the wheel, I’m seemingly returning to them, but in a decidedly different way. Just as Grianstad an tSamhraidh and Grianstad an Gheimhridh are relatively minor holidays with simple offerings, so are the Equinoxes. Or so will they be. To me, it makes sense, both as a modern practitioner and one decidedly influenced (as we all are, whether someone wants to admit it or not) by modern Pagan practices and communities. I think I fought this for as long as I did because of clinging to a Recon label, but I find that so constricting now. Is my practice any less informed by history? Not at all. I’m simply makin room for new ideas and evolution. And if I decide I don’t like it or it doesn’t work, I can always drop it again. But for now, it feels right.

Additionally, as I begin to explore ADF, it makes sense to me to find meaning in times like this that I, personally, already find meaningful. And who is to say that this wouldn’t have been a natural evolution anyway? So often anymore, it seems that hardcore Gaelic Recons want to simply act as gatekeepers rather than spiritually sound people or even individuals who can agree that all our practices won’t look the same. Just as Áine was honored locally, not nationally considering that’s a modern construct itself, it only drives home the point of a truly local cultus that can express the needs and desires of practitioners.

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8 thoughts on “A Return to the Past, A Path to the Future

  1. Historically speaking, the four Fire Festivals were probably among the very last gaelic festivities to resist christianisation; it’s not impossible that there weren’t others. In fact, there are traces of the quarter days having been significant to the culture(s) that dominated Ireland before the Celts’ arrival. The Loughcrew passage tomb’s interior lights up on both equinoxes, the Newgrange passage tomb also takes advantage of the sun’s light during the winter solstice…
    To be honest, it would be very odd if an ancient polytheistic culture only celebrated four festivals, and since Ireland was inhabited by many tribes, during the Iron Age, their religious views would hardly be as unified as if they were dictated by some holy book (and even religions which depend on holy books seem to be unable to prevent schisms within their ranks).
    I’ma reconstructionist myself, and though some might call it an paradox, I see no issue in creating a new festival just so you can celebrate an event or deity. That’s how festivals were started in the first place, and you can’t expect us to stick to the often unsatisfactory amount of surviving lore.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That is an absolutely excellent point! Thank you for that! I think sometimes people, definitely myself included, get wrapped up in one way of thinkin so much that we don’t always notice the glaring faults and flaws, or even room for various interpretation and havin someone else come in is so helpful. I really appreciate it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • My pleasure! I feel we really need to work together in these matters, otherwise we risk becoming roleplayers “with benefits”. I respect all the folklore, literature, and archaeology, but it’s still not enough; if we restrict ourselves to that, our religions will remain forever fragmented. It’s time to grow beyond what we know, using all that precious knowledge as a foundation.

        Liked by 1 person

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